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The Eternal Ones

The Eternal Ones - Kirsten Miller The Eternal Ones started off extremely well. It took an inherently cheesy stereotype (lovers through time), and made it not just entertaining but believable. The author gets rid of all the far-too-convenient logistics of having visions from a past life: they don't start as a teen, but as a child; Haven doesn't hide them from her family, because they result in violent outbursts; Haven doesn't immediately think they're real, because the entire town believes she's possessed by the devil (that is, except the Penecostals up the road). It's a brilliant idea: a young girl hated by Born Again Christians who was - literally - born again.

So, yeah. Everything started off well. Sure, the main character had a tendency to change her mind every few minutes, but hey, she had a traumatic childhood.

But then she ups and moves to New York to stalk a rich playboy, and the entire novel falls into a deep, dark well of I-can't-believe-someone-wrote-this-crap terrible.

And to think, it started off so well.

The rest of the book revolves around Haven going back and forth between being completely and utterly in love with Ethan/Iain (the aforementioned playboy), and being convinced that he is a lying, murdering, cheating ass. Now, if you were to ask - say - any normal person, they would tell you that these two beliefs cannot exist simultaneously. If you believe the man you met two days before is out to kill you, then you do not decide to sleep with him "one last time". You wouldn't be convinced by a couple of well-delivered excuses and you sure as hell wouldn't stay in his house. Or, if you are certain that the world is just trying to frame the man you love for crimes he never committed, then you don't go around taking the word of a stranger over his!

Over a 20-page period, Haven went from convinced Ethan/Iain was trying to kill her, then back to believing that he was her eternal soulmate who would never lie to her, until finally deciding that, actually, she might have fallen in love with the wrong guy. Seriously? Seriously?

While Haven's flip-flopping emotions were my biggest issue with this book, there were a whole bunch of other problems in it. The underlying "mystery" was an flat as a pancake (not to mention, completely illogical), the secondary characters were 10 kinds of stereotypical, and the villain was utterly deranged (but not in that cool, Disney!villain sort of way).

Bottom line? Don't read this - the illogic will hurt your brain.

http://deadbookdarling.com/2011/10/review-eternal-ones-by-kirsten-miller.html